Wetsuit

by completetri.com
The swim portions for many of our triathlons take place in Pacific Ocean harbors. Ocean water can always be cold, so many of our racers consider using wetsuits. Water temps of under 70 degrees often justify a wetsuit, and temps between 70-78 are definitely wetsuit optional. Using a wetsuit might be a new experience for some, so here is some background as you prepare for the race.

Whether you borrow, buy, or rent a wetsuit, make sure you are comfortable in it. In the weeks leading up to a race, try your wetsuit on at home – remember, “nothing new on race day.” It will be tight, but this is completely normal. Wetsuits are supposed to be tight. When you go for a practice swim prior to race day, you may get the illusion of moving more slowly in the water, but that's false as there'll be an improvement to the swim split in your first race using a wetsuit. When you practice in a pool, there's no need to don your wetsuit as that will only wear it out faster. In addition to keeping you warmer, a wetsuit will also assist your buoyancy. This flotation assistance commonly helps first timers feel more secure in the water, and can be worth it if you are nervous about the swim.

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Triathlon Gear

by completetri.com
Many of our aspiring triathletes have many questions as they enter the sport for the first time. How should you train? How much should you spend on equipment? What gear do you need? The final question is relatively straightforward.

The most important rule of triathlon clothing is to be comfortable. Do what works for you. The answer for a competitive Ironman might be different than for someone looking to finish their first mini-sprint. Regardless of the ultimate path you take with your triathlon clothing, remember that you need to be comfortable during training and racing. That is much more important than how much you spend or how you look.

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Laying Out A Transition Area

by Michael Pate, beginnertriathlete.com
How to properly and effectively lay out your triathlon transition area.
 
I can be most anywhere - whether it is a concert, campaign rally or a retail store, and people will walk up to me and ask me questions about something.  It has almost become a joke among some of my closest friends because the people asking me the questions sometimes know more about what is going on than I do.  It comes as no surprise that when I am at triathlons, people come up and ask questions and many of them have to do with laying out a transition area.  Over the last ten triathlon experiences I have had, I have found what works for me and it seems to be working for others. 

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Preventing Triathlon Swim Panic

by Coach Tony
Swim panic, and associated hyperventilation, is often experienced by new triathletes and veteran triathletes in cold water. Dealing with triathlon swim panic is why some experienced triathletes think twice before committing to cold-water events. Understanding the factors that contribute to open water swim panic, preparing accordingly, recognizing the emotion when it begins, and knowing how to react are all important towards overcoming a negative experience and having good swim regardless of your triathlon experience level.

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